Tennis Elbow and Chiropractic Treatment

Chiropractic

Visiting a Chiropractor for Tennis Elbow

Do you have constant pain or aches on the outside of your elbow? If so, you may have what medical practitioners call lateral epicondylitis. Tennis elbow is a painful condition that causes a constant pain where your forearm’s tendons attach to a boney bump on the outside of your elbow joint.

When your elbow is overloaded or overworked by repetitive motions using your arms, forearms, and wrists, the tendons around your elbow may become inflamed, causing discomfort and pain.

If you are looking to regain the full use of your elbow while getting rid of the pain, then a visit to a chiropractor for tennis elbow may be the best way to help you. Luckily, there is more than one option available to you when seeking treatment for tennis elbow, but it’s important that you find the best possible solution for your specific circumstances.

Let’s understand tennis elbow in more detail…

What is Tennis Elbow?

Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is the weakening and inflammation of the tendons joining your forearm muscle to your elbow bone. The condition is generally painful, will initially develop on the outside of your elbow, and may spread further into the arms without effective treatment. Not restricted to tennis players, tennis elbow can affect anyone who does any kind of repetitive movements with their arms.

Causes

Tennis elbow is a long-term condition caused by overuse and strain on the outer side of your elbow.

Any activity with repetitive motions or repetitive movements that cause overuse of your tendons in the forearm can cause tennis elbow. Activities that require your arms and wrists for gripping such as lifting weights, swinging bats, gripping on anything firmly, opening a jar, turning doorknobs, shaking hands, or even holding a coffee cup can contribute towards tennis elbow and the associated pain.

Common in racquet sports such as tennis and squash, tennis elbow can just as easily occur in other sports, jobs or hobbies that require repetitive gripping and arm movements. These activities include painting, working with hammers and screwdrivers, cooking that requires cutting, extended periods of writing, and/or using a computer mouse.

Tennis elbow usually develops over time, where repetitive movements and physical forces place additional strain and stress on your tendons. Those stresses can eventually cause microscopic tears in your tendon muscles which become inflamed and painful.

Symptoms

The most obvious symptom of tennis elbow is experiencing a constant pain in the outside of your elbow, where your forearm muscle meets your elbow. As your muscles become inflamed, it will be painful and difficult to do most basic activities that would require range of motion in your elbow, forearm, and wrists, particularly for activities associated with gripping.

Quick shout out to Tennis Elbow’s cousin, Golfer’s Elbow, which has very similar symptoms but where the associated pain is on the inside of your elbow, (medial epicondylitis).

Tennis Elbow Pain

The location of tennis elbow pain usually starts at the outside of your elbow where your forearm muscle meets your elbow joint, but it may spread to your forearm and wrist, becoming a serious condition that will only get worse without proper treatment. If you are experiencing pain on the outside of your elbow, the best thing to do would be to avoid the activity or activities that are causing excess stress on the elbow. If your pain is severe, or if the pain is not going away, you may want to consider seeking advice from a medical practitioner.

Am I at Risk?

Tennis elbow is estimated to affect less than 3% of people, mostly aged 30 to 50, who place repetitive stress and forceful motions on their wrists, forearm muscles, and elbow joints.

The condition will be more severe if your form or technique is incorrect causing your grip, hold, swing, or lift to unintentionally place extra stress on your muscles and joints.

Luckily tennis elbow can be treated and if your pain is not yet severe, you may be able to treat the condition at home, starting with resting your arms and avoiding the repetitive activities.

Tennis Elbow Treatment

If you have a mild case of tennis elbow where your pain is still bearable, consider the following home-remedies that may help speed up your recovery:

  • Rest your elbow and avoid the repetitive activities that may be contributing to your pain
  • Ice your elbow to help reduce swelling (inflammation) and pain. Generally accepted advice is to place ice in a towel and on your skin for roughly 25 minutes, 3 to 4 times a day, for 2 or 3 days
  • Compression for your elbow, using a strap or sleeve to help reduce strain on the inflamed tendons
  • Painkillers and Anti-Inflammatory Medicine (nonsteroidal) may help with pain and swelling

If your pain is more severe, your doctor will be able to provide a more accurate diagnosis of your condition after a physical examination. You may not be able to avoid this injury in the first place, but you can seek medical attention to correct the pain and restore your quality of life. Many patients have been able to regain a full range of movement when experiencing tennis elbow.

Chiropractic Care for Tennis Elbow

Chiropractors are highly trained health experts who can assist with a variety of ailments, including tennis elbow. Through a range of chiropractic adjustments, a chiropractor can help treat sports injuries, neck pain, back pain, elbow injuries, injuries to soft tissue, ligaments, joints, spinal injuries, and many other conditions.

Chiropractic treatment can provide you with fast and effective relief from tennis elbow pain. If you have been experiencing symptoms of tennis elbow, the best course of action is to visit a health care professional for a diagnosis and treatment plan that works with your lifestyle. Your chiropractor can also help you to improve your technique (form), reducing your chance of risk and helping to prevent future injuries.

Dr Matt le Roux is a qualified chiropractor who specializes in Sports Chiropractic and is ready to help you on your way to recovery from your tennis elbow and the associated pain.

Simply book an online appointment today and start your way to recovery from tennis elbow.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Where is tennis elbow pain located?

The location of tennis elbow pain usually starts at the outside of your elbow where your forearm muscle meets your elbow joint, but it may spread to your forearm and wrist becoming a serious condition that will only get worse without proper treatment. Find out more about how to identify and treat tennis elbow.

What helps tennis elbow pain?

The most common home-remedies for tennis elbow pain include ice to the affected area, compression support to the injured tendons, painkillers, and anti-inflammatory medication. If your condition is more severe, chiropractic care can help reduce your pain and speed up your recovery.

Does tennis elbow pain come and go?

Tennis elbow pain will typically remain painful and uncomfortable until the area is treated. In fact, the pain may worsen with time because the pain is caused by damage to the tendons that join your forearm muscle to your elbow joint, which become inflamed and painful. The best thing to do if you are experiencing pain is to avoid the activities that are contributing towards your tennis elbow.

Can chiropractors help tennis elbow?

Chiropractors are highly trained health experts who can assist with a variety of ailments, including tennis elbow, with chiropractic care having shown to help alleviate pain, reduce frequency of pain episodes, and even increase the range of motion in the affected arm.

Can tennis elbow pain radiate to your shoulder?

Tennis elbow pain can spread through your arm affecting the forearms, wrists, upper arms, and shoulders. This pain is more likely associated with your body attempting to compensate for your weakness in your elbows. Find out more about tennis elbow pain and know when to see a medical professional.

Can tennis elbow pain radiate to your upper arms?

Tennis elbow pain can spread through your arm affecting the forearms, wrists, upper arms, and shoulders. This pain is more likely associated with your body attempting to compensate for weaknesses in your elbows. Find out more about tennis elbow pain and know when to see a medical professional.

References:

WebMD
https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/tennis-elbow-lateral-epicondylitis
https://www.webmd.com/pain-management/tennis-elbow

Mayo Clinic
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tennis-elbow/symptoms-causes/syc-20351987
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/golfers-elbow/symptoms-causes/syc-20372868

NHS UK
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/tennis-elbow/

OrthoInfo
https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases–conditions/tennis-elbow-lateral-epicondylitis/

Dr. Matt le Roux is a man of many talents: chiropractor, sports scientist and functional medicine practitioner. His science-based approach motivates him to explore the synergy between health and performance that changes the way you move, live, train, think, and eat.

Dr Matt le Roux

Chiropractor, Functional medicine practitioner

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